Social Capital

Personal identity

Being able to express ‘who they are’ is important for people’s sense of self and overall wellbeing. A society which is inclusive of differences is desirable as it enables members to participate fully in life, and gives them a sense of belonging and security [22].

This indicator presents the proportion who reported it was easy or very easy to be themselves in New Zealand, as reported in the 2018 and 2019 Canterbury Wellbeing Surveys.

The figure shows that in 2018 and 2019, approximately 80 percent (80.1% and 79.1%, respectively) of respondents in greater Christchurch indicated that they find it easy or very easy to be themselves in New Zealand.

The figure shows that in 2018, a statistically significantly higher proportion of Selwyn District respondents (85.6%) indicated they found it easy or very easy to be themselves in New Zealand, when compared to Christchurch City respondents. However there are no statistically significant differences in the 2019 proportions for Christchurch City, Selwyn District, or Waimakariri District.

The figure shows that in 2018 and 2019, European respondents were more likely than Māori respondents and those in the Pacific/Asian/Indian ethnic group, to report that it was very easy or easy to be themselves in New Zealand (84.3%; 74.5%; and 51.5% in 2018 and 82.2%; 71.2%; and 52.5% in 2019, respectively). The differences between the three groups are statistically significant at both time-points.

The figure shows that in 2018 and 2019, younger people were less likely than older people to report that it was very easy or easy to be themselves in New Zealand (18–24 years, 73.7%; 25–34 years, 77.4%; 35–49 years, 75.2%; 50–64 years, 80.3%; 65–74 years, 85.9%; and 75+ years 92.4% in 2019). The difference shown between young people’s (18–24 years) ease of being themselves, and those in the four oldest age groups (35–49 years, 50–64 years, 65–74 years, and 75+ years), is statistically significant in 2018, and for the two oldest age groups in 2019.

The figure shows that males and females expressed a similar level of ease with being themselves in New Zealand in 2018 and 2019 (82.0% of females reported it was very easy or easy to be themselves, compared with 78.4% of males in 2018 and 79.5% and 79.3%, respectively, in 2019).

In 2018 and 2019, people with higher household incomes were more likely than people with lower household incomes to feel it was very easy or easy to be themselves in New Zealand (in 2019 87.2% of those with annual household incomes over $100,000; 75.9% with incomes $60,001–$100,000; and 75.7% with incomes $30,000–$60,000; compared with 72.4% for those with incomes under $30,000). The proportion for the highest income group is statistically significantly higher than for all other groups at both the 2018 and 2019 time-points.

The figure shows, in 2018 and 2019, respondents with a long-term health condition or disability were statistically significantly less likely to indicate that it is very easy or easy for them to be themselves in New Zealand (73.8% and 73.1%, respectively) compared with those respondents without a long-term health condition or disability (82.3% and 80.9%, respectively).

Data Sources

Source: Canterbury District Health Board.
Survey/data set: Canterbury Wellbeing Survey to 2019. Access publicly available data from the Community and Public Health (Canterbury DHB) website www.cph.co.nz/your-health/wellbeing-survey/
Source data frequency: Annually.

View technical notes and data tables for this indicator.

Updated: 26/11/2019