Health

Self-rated health

Self-rated health allows people to weigh together the different aspects of health that they consider most important [9]. In many health surveys, self-rated health is measured by a single question [9] and studies have found only very small differences in responses between different question wordings; suggesting that most single-question measures of health status tap into the same concept [10]. Self-rated health provides information in addition to standard clinical assessments of health status.

The Canterbury Wellbeing Survey has included the question, ‘In general, how would you rate your health’, since 2017 [11]. The question is scored using a five-category response format: poor–excellent.

This indicator presents the proportion of those 18 years and over rating their health as good, very good, or excellent, in the 2017 and 2018 Canterbury Wellbeing Surveys.

The figure shows that the proportion of respondents reporting good, very good or excellent self-rated health in the 2018 Canterbury Wellbeing Survey was 82.2 percent. This proportion is essentially unchanged from 2017 (82.7%).

The figure shows no statistically significant differences in the proportion of respondents rating their health as good, very good or excellent in the 2017 and 2018 Canterbury Wellbeing Surveys, by Territorial Authority (Christchurch City, 81.8%; Selwyn District, 86.2%; and Waimakariri District, 82.0%, in 2018).

The figure shows the proportion of respondents rating their health as good, very good or excellent, for European respondents, Māori respondents, and for Pacific/Asian/Indian respondents (83.6%, 77.2%, and 71.6%, respectively, in 2018). European respondents had better self-rated health (a statistically significantly higher proportion rating their health as good, very good, or excellent), than Pacific/Asian/Indian respondents in 2018. In 2017, the proportion for European respondents was significantly higher than that for both Māori respondents and Pacific/Asian/Indian respondents.

The figure shows a pattern of generally similar self-rated health (proportion rating their health as good, very good or excellent) for the age groups 18 to 24 years, 25 to 34 years, 35 to 49 years, 60 to 64 years, and 65+ years, for 2017 and 2018 (all falling into the range 76.9% to 85.5%).

The figure shows a pattern of generally similar self-rated health (proportion rating their health as good, very good or excellent) for female and male respondents, in 2017 and 2018 (no statistically significant differences).

The figure shows a positive relationship between annual household income and self-rated health (such as the proportion of those rating their health as good, very good or excellent increases with increasing income). The differences between the four income groups shown were all statistically significant in 2017 and all but one comparison ($30,000–$60,000 vs. $60,000–$100,000) were statistically significant in 2018. In 2018, almost all (92.5%) of those respondents from the $100,000+ income group rated their health as good, very good or excellent, compared with less than two-thirds (62.8%) of those from the <$30,000 income group (a substantial and statistically significant difference).

The figure shows that respondents with a disability or long-term health condition indicated poorer self-rated health (a statistically significantly smaller proportion rating their health as good, very good or excellent) compared with those respondents without a disability or long-term health condition, in 2017 and 2018 (48.9% with and 90.2% without a disability or long-term health condition, in 2018). The 2018 result was essentially unchanged from 2017 (44.4% and 91.2% respectively).

Data Sources

Source: Canterbury District Health Board.
Survey/data set: Canterbury Wellbeing Survey to 2018. Access publicly available data from the Community and Public Health (Canterbury DHB) website at www.cph.co.nz/your-health/wellbeing-survey/
Source data frequency: Annually.

View technical notes and data tables for this indicator.

Updated: 21/11/2018